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2017 Tax Reform: Moving Expense Reimbursement

2017 Tax Reform: Moving Expense Reimbursement
These videos are designed to educate viewers on 2017 Tax Reform. These videos are not to be construed as legal advice. Please seek the advice of a local attorney regarding your specific situation.
For more online sources on this and similar topics, please visit any of the following resources: www.youtube.com/tibbslawoffice
www.tibbslawoffice.com
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Tibbs Law Office: Introduction to 2018

In this video, Daryle C. Tibbs updates the audience on what Tibbs Law Office has in store for 2018.  In addition to the fact that Tibbs Law Office has hired its third experienced attorney, Tibbs Law Office will be moving office spaces to accommodate its clients starting April 1.  In addition, the attorneys of Tibbs Law Office will be getting mediation and parenting coordination training to be able to offer these services before the end of 2018.

Top 10 Videos of 2018: #4 With 236 views during 2018, this video was the fourth most watched video of 2018.

Book Review – Crazy Time

I highly recommend this book to people in the early stages of learning about the divorce that is barreling down the highway towards them. Crazy time, as the title suggests, acknowledges the craziness that can be divorce. This book focuses on the different stages of the process and the different ways for dealing with those stages. All of this is written through the lens of the author that describes the final days of, what she now acknowledges as the end of her marriage. This book is especially important for someone that has had very little experience with divorce, which we may believe can be very few people anymore that have not experienced divorce; however, people have a tendency and an ability to refuse to believe that this could ever happen to them. This is for those people. If they have blinders on when speaking to friends about their divorce, they probably have blinders on in their own marriage. The best part about this book is that before wrapping up, it acknowledges the good that comes out of marriages ending. This is important to me because this is one of the things I enjoy about my job. I get to see the transition from scared and weak to strong and ready for the change. This book presents the greener pastures beautifully. I would give this book five stars.

Introduction To Tibbs Law Office

Top 10 Videos of 2015:  Introduction To Tibbs Law Office

In this video series, Tibbs Law Office is reviewing their top 10 videos of 2015, continuing with number 5, “Introduction To Tibbs Law Office”

For more online sources on this and similar topics, please visit our firm youtube channel at:

www.youtube.com/tibbslawoffice

www.youtube.com/tibbslawofficeKentucky

Tibbs Law Office, LLC
1329 East Kemper Rd. #4230
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 793-7544
www.tibbslawoffice.com

Family Law: What Case Expenses Are Involved In A Divorce Case in Ohio?

Family Law: What case expenses are involved in a divorce case?

Daryle C. Tibbs, owner of Tibbs Law Office, continues a new series dedicated to the topic of Family Law.

For more online sources on this and similar topics, please visit our firm youtube channel at:

www.youtube.com/tibbslawoffice

www.youtube.com/tibbslawofficeKentucky

Tibbs Law Office, LLC
1329 East Kemper Rd. #4230
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 793-7544
www.tibbslawoffice.com

Family Law: Will the court order my spouse to pay my attorneys fees in a divorce?

Family Law: Will the court order my spouse to pay my attorneys fees in a divorce?

Daryle C. Tibbs, owner of Tibbs Law Office, begins a new series dedicated to the topic of Family Law.

For more online sources on this and similar topics, please visit our firm youtube channel at:

www.youtube.com/tibbslawoffice

www.youtube.com/tibbslawofficeKentucky

Tibbs Law Office, LLC
1329 East Kemper Rd. #4230
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 793-7544
www.tibbslawoffice.com

Tibbs Law Office, LLC Introduction to 2017

Allow us to introduce ourselves.  This video should have been created and posted several months ago; however, its better late than never!  We hope you find our content helpful in your search for justice.

Top 10 Videos of 2018: #8 With 99 views during 2018, this video was the eighth most watched video of 2018.

Tibbs Law Office, LLC
1329 East Kemper Rd. #4230
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 793-7544
www.tibbslawoffice.com

http://www.youtube.com/tibbslawoffice

www.youtube.com/tibbslawofficeKentucky


Juvenile Court- Delinquency and Unruly Cases

Because many attorneys do not work in the juvenile courts, it is something I get asked about often.  Juvenile court is very different from common pleas and municipal court.  I got interested in working in the juvenile court when I was working on my Masters degree at Xavier University.  It was at Xavier that I learned that juvenile courts were developed to deal with the unique issues of juveniles and to help give children a second chance when they mess up.  Unfortunately, juvenile courts have morphed into something very different since their creation.

Many clients contact me regarding their son or daughter’s case.  Often times, the parent is not satisfied with the advice they are getting from the court appointed counsel.  I do my best to explain the following:

1) If your son or daughter is charged with a “crime” in juvenile court it is called either “delinquency” or “unruly.”
2) Your child basically has two choices.  They can admit the allegations in the complaint, or they can deny the allegations in the complaint.
3) If your child admits the allegations, the case automatically goes to disposition and the child is “sentenced.”  Depending on the allegation, sentencing may include probation, writing a letter of apology, time in detention, house arrest, community service, and many other options, all at the discretion of the Magistrate or Judge.
4) If your child denies the allegations, the court sets the case for a trial.  At trial, the court will determine whether the juvenile is responsible for the alleged acts.  Unfortunately, if your child denies the allegations but then is found responsible for the acts, the fact that your child denied the allegations may be used against your child when it comes time for disposition (although not overtly).

Many parents admit to me that their child committed the act alleged; however, they do not feel their child should admit to the allegations because of the repercussions later in life.  I would agree with this approach 99% of the time for adults; however not necessarily with juveniles in juvenile court.

The juvenile should certainly ask for counsel to be appointed.  Once appointed, counsel can solicit plea offers; however, plea bargains are not offered as often in juvenile court as they are in common pleas court and they do not have quite the same effect in juvenile court.  The reason pleas are not offered as often is because the child does not get “charged” unless the prosecutor has a solid case.  The reason pleas do not have the same effect as in common pleas or municipal court is because in those courts, the crime of conviction often dictates the parameters of sentencing that the Judge can order.  In juvenile court, the Judge has a lot of discretion because sentencing guidelines in juvenile court do not exist.  Even if the child admits the allegations, he/she will still be given the opportunity to make a statement and provide mitigating arguments, which is often all the juvenile wants.

While it is never a bad idea to get a second opinion in your case, if your court appointed counsel is asking your child to admit the allegation in a juvenile court case, this is probably not the result of laziness or incompetence.  You should ask the child’s attorney what other options you have, assuming that your child committed the alleged act.  You will likely see that your other options aren’t great.

If your child vehemently denies the allegation, you must decide whether you believe him/her.  Hiring counsel and going to trial is only a good option if your child really didn’t commit the alleged act (and not just that they deny doing it, but that they, in fact, didn’t do it) and that is something that you probably don’t know for sure, unless you were there when the incident occurred.