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What is the legal age to marry in Ohio?

In this video, Daryle answers the common question of “What is the legal age to marry in Ohio?” Make sure to LIKE and SUBSCRIBE! We have new content weekly and as always, we welcome your comments!

Transcript: Person Speaking: Daryle

The legal age to marry in Ohio is 18 for both males and females without the consent of a parent. Girls can marry at the age of 16 with the consent of both of their parents. Or the court can grant consent for the marriage of minors if there is a pregnancy.

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In this video, Daryle answers the common question of “How was a common law marriage established in Ohio before October 10, 1991”. Make sure to LIKE and SUBSCRIBE! We have new content weekly and as always, we welcome your comments!

Transcript: Person Speaking: Daryle

In Ohio, to establish a common law marriage. it required a mutual agreement to marry, the parties must have represented themselves as married to the public as married, the parties must have lived together for seven years, the parties must have been competent to marry, and the parties had to be recognized as married in the community.

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TIBBS LAW OFFICE
1329 E. Kemper Rd. #4230
Cincinnati, OH 45246
P: 513-793-7544
F: 513-297-7544

 

Credit Repair

If you have ever made a large purchase with a boyfriend or girlfriend, you probably know what a nightmare it can turn out to be.  It is an even bigger hassle if the big purchase is a house and the other party doesn’t contribute to the payments after the breakup.  If you would like to get married some day, I would not recommend making any large purchases with someone you are not related to or married to; however, just like a lot of advice coming from an attorney: this may be too little too late.
If you purchased a home with someone who is no longer contributing to the payments, there are a few options.  Do not consider foreclosure just because you want closure with the person (believe it or not, clients have suggested this option).  Do not panic.  It is understandable that you want this person to be removed from the loan and title; however, it is not imperative that you act (irrationally) today.  You should not be too concerned about getting them removed from the loan (since this is an obligation and not necessarily a right) unless the person is insisting that they be removed from the loan in exchange for being removed from the title.  You may be able to get the person removed from the loan by refinancing.  If you are unable to refinance due to a low credit score, you should call Credit Smart Solutions owned and operated by Joe Frey, a credit specialilst.  Joe can evaluate your situation in a free consultation and tell you whether he can help and by how much.  Once your credit score has improved and reached the goal score, Joe can put you in contact with a mortgage company that he does business with that should be able to help you refinance.
If you are unable to refinance, you should not panic.  If you sell the home, or otherwise pay off the home, an attorney should be able to prepare a quit claim deed for around $100-$150 to send to your significant other.  If the other party refuses too sign the quit claim deed, the attorney can explain your other options.